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Past Events

Webinar—Sustainable Financing for Watershed Governance

 

On May 26th, the WSP is hosting the fourth webinar in its 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. Register now!

WHAT: Sustainable Financing for Watershed Governance
DATE: Tuesday, May 26th, 2015
TIME: 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT (12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET)

British Columbia’s new Water Sustainability Act offers potential opportunities to enable alternative water and watershed governance arrangements. If new governance arrangements are enabled, sustainable long-term funding will be critical. What are the options to secure these necessary financial resources?

In this webinar, the speakers will present a wide range of financial mechanisms and models that could be used to support collaborative approaches to watershed governance. Although grounded in the B.C. context, this webinar will offer insight and value for communities across the country. Drawing on a number of real-world examples, Steve Litke (Senior Program Manager, Watersheds and Water Resources, Fraser Basin Council) will present key findings from recent research conducted by the Fraser Basin Council. Christine Bergeron (Director, Community Business, Vancity) will then provide insight from her experience working within the financial sector.

This webinar is the fourth instalment in the 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. It will build on the September 2014 webinar “A Blueprint for Watershed Governance in British Columbia,” which focused on nine “winning conditions” needed to move towards a more sophisticated approach to watershed governance in B.C. This upcoming webinar will explore the winning condition of sustainable long-term funding.

**SPACE IS LIMITED** Register now!

**If you are in Victoria, B.C., we will be hosting a live viewing at the Centre for Global Studies on the University of Victoria campus. Contact Megan Spencer for more details.**

Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming Forests on Haida Gwaii – Book Launch & Panel Discussion

 

Join UVic’s Centre for Global Studies and POLIS Project on Ecological Governance at a book launch to celebrate and discuss one of Canada’s most contentious land-use conflicts—and one of its most important models of cultural and ecological renewal.

DATE: Monday, March 30th, 2015

TIME: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., with book viewing and signing to follow

LOCATION: First Peoples House, UVic

The newly published book Islands’ Spirit Rising examines the long-term conflict over Haida Gwaii’s ancient forests and recent events that unfolded in the context of collaborative land-use planning. In response to threats posed by a century of logging, a local indigenous/ environmental/ community movement built enough momentum to challenge a multinational forest industry and the political structures enabling it.

Featuring two of B.C.’s most influential First Nation leaders, as well as the author of Islands’ Spirit Rising, the evening will trace the evolution of the Haida’s battle to regain control over their homeland, from the early days of Haida resistance to the modern context of alliances, legal battles, and evolving forms of governance. The speakers will also reflect on the broader implications of the Haida’s strategies and successes, with an audience Q&A to follow.

PANELISTS: Dr. Louise Takeda, Author & POLIS Affiliate; Guujaaw, Former President, Haida NationKekinusuqs, Dr. Judith Sayers, Former Elected Chief, Hupacasath First Nation & UVic adjunct professor; Dr. Michael M’Gonigle, Eco-Research Chair in Environmental Law and Policy & UVic professor.

This event is free and open to the public.

Webinar—Groundwater Reform: Lessons from California

On March 20th, the WSP is hosting the third webinar in its 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. Register now!

WHAT: Groundwater Reform: Lessons from California
DATE: Friday, March 20th, 2015
TIME: 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT (12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET)

In today’s age of uncertainty with a changing climate and shifting social priorities around water use, jurisdictions across the globe are rethinking how fresh water is managed and governed to ensure responsiveness to changing circumstances—both ecologically and socially. California and British Columbia are both in the process of creating new groundwater regulatory regimes.

In this webinar, guest speakers Thomas Harter (Faculty, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis) and Randy Christensen (Lawyer, Ecojustice Canada; Research Associate, POLIS Project) will discuss a recent California law reform and new approaches to groundwater management, and explore lessons that could be offered for the British Columbia context under B.C.’s new Water Sustainability Act.

This webinar is the third instalment in the 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. It will build on the September 2014 webinar “A Blueprint for Watershed Governance in British Columbia,” which focused on nine “winning conditions” needed to move towards a more sophisticated approach to watershed governance in B.C. This upcoming webinar will explore in more detail the winning condition of needing a functional legal framework for sustainable water and watershed management.

**SPACE IS LIMITED** Register now!

Canada Water Week: Film Screening and Discussion Panel with MP Elizabeth May

 

UVic's Centre for Global Studies, POLIS Project on Ecological Governance and the Water, Innovation and Global Governance Lab (Department of Geography) present "Canada Water Week: Film Screening and Discussion Panel with MP Elizabeth May"

DATE: Thursday, March 19th, 2015

TIME: 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

LOCATION: University of Victoria, Hickman Bldg, Room 105

The evening will begin with a screening of the short film Cold Amazon, a story of Canada's Mackenzie River Basin. The film highlights the importance and vulnerability of this watershed through the voices of those who rely on its health and work for its protection. Following the screening, MP Elizabeth May will deliver a talk discussing issues of water governance, policy, and sustainability. Additional panelists from UVic will share their views and there will be a moderated discussion and audience Q&A.

Elizabeth May is an environmentalist, writer, activist, lawyer, leader of the Green Party of Canada and Member of Parliament for Saanich-Gulf Islands. Elizabeth May has a long record as a committed and dedicated advocate for social justice, for the environment, for human rights and for economic pragmatic solutions.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVPs are not required but are appreciated. Please email cfgsworkstudy@uvic.ca if you plan to attend. 

Working Better Together Conference on Indigenous Research Ethics

The "Working Better Together Conference on Indigenous Research Ethics" will take place February 19-20th, 2015 at the Listel Hotel in downtown Vancouver, BC.

This event will bring together community-engaged academic and community researchers, educators, practitioners, policy makers, analysts and research
administrators to explore what it really means – and what it takes – to work collaboratively in Indigenous research.

With guidance, inspiration and concrete examples provided by some of the leading experts in Canada, we will explore the dynamic intersection of policies, procedures, practices, and philosophies of contemporary Indigenous research ethics.

The event combines formal presentations with interactive opportunities to support information exchanges, networking and resource sharing. It will be of interest and value to those prepared to actively share their experience and expertise as well as to learn from what is shared by others.

Please note that space is limited in this event so early registration is recommended.

The POLIS Project and Centre for Global Studies are pleased to be co-sponsors of the conference with the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project (SFU) and the International Society of Ethnobiology.

Conference home:
https://indigenousresearchethics2015.wordpress.com

Public Lecture—"The Future of Water Law and Governance: An Ecological Perspective"

At this event, Oliver M. Brandes (Co-Director, POLIS Project on Ecological Governance) will speak on the future of water law and governance from an ecological perspective.This event is being presented as part of Alumni Week 2015, a celebration of UVic alumni "thinkers, changers and difference-makers," hosted by the UVic Division of Continuing Studies.
 
DATE: February 5th, 2015
 
TIME: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
 
LOCATION: University of Victoria, David Turpin Building, Room A104
 
Advance registration has closed for the event, but tickets are available at the door. There is no cost to attend the event. More information is provided here: https://extrweb.uvic.ca/ContinuingStudiesLecture2015

Webinar—Aboriginal Co-Governance of Water and Watersheds

On December 1st, the POLIS Water Sustainability Project is hosting the second webinar in its 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. Register now!

WHAT: Aboriginal Co-Governance of Water and Watersheds
DATE: Monday, December 1st, 2014
TIME: 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT (12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET)

In this webinar, Eli Enns (ICCA Consortium/POLIS Project), Nadia Joe (First Nations Fisheries Council), and Merrell-Ann Phare (Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources) will discuss the critical need for and importance of co-governance of water and watersheds with First Nations. The speakers will describe successful examples, emerging opportunities for change, and what conditions or frameworks must be in place to ensure co-governance arrangements can really thrive.

This discussion will have relevance across Canada, and particularly in B.C. given its new Water Sustainability Actand the opportunities this legislation provides for shared decision-making and delegated authority. Across the country, co-governance with First Nations will be a necessary and valuable foundation for moving towards a more sophisticated approach to watershed governance that respects our common need for water.

This webinar is the second instalment in the 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series. It will build on the September 2014 webinar “A Blueprint for Watershed Governance in British Columbia,” which focused on nine “winning conditions” needed to move towards watershed governance in B.C. This upcoming webinar will explore in more detail the winning condition of aboriginal co-governance.

**SPACE IS LIMITED** Register now!

Webinar—A Blueprint for Watershed Governance in B.C.

On September 17th, the POLIS Water Sustainability Project hosted the first webinar in its 2014/2015 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series.

WHAT: A Blueprint for Watershed Governance in British Columbia
DATE: Wednesday, September 17th, 2014
TIME: 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT (12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET)

In this webinar, Oliver M. Brandes (Co-Director, POLIS Project on Ecological Governance) and Jon O’Riordan (Strategic Advisor, POLIS Project on Ecological Governance; Former Deputy Minister, B.C. Ministry of Sustainable Resource Management) explored current water and watershed governance issues in British Columbia. The focus was on some of the “winning conditions” needed to move towards a more sophisticated approach to watershed governance in B.C. This discussion on the evolving state of watershed governance is relevant across Canada, but grounded in the context of changes in B.C., including the introduction of B.C.’s new Water Sustainability Act.

The session closed with a broader discussion of the emerging priority issues and potential next steps as jurisdictions across Canada seek to achieve the goal of enhanced watershed management and better governance of their home waters.

Webinar—Resilience Thinking and the Future of Watersheds

On June 26th, the POLIS Water Sustainability Project hosted the final webinar in its 2013/2014 Creating a Blue Dialogue webinar series.

WHAT: Resilience Thinking and the Future of Watersheds
DATE: Thursday, June 26th, 2014
TIME: 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PT (12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. ET)

In this webinar, Ryan Plummer (Director, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre; Senior Research Fellow, Stockholm Resilience Centre) explored the concept of “resilience thinking,” which involves the ability to deal with change and crises in a watershed context. Using progressive examples from Sweden and Canada, he discussed new tools for dealing with both foreseen (e.g. climate change) and unforeseen (e.g. flooding or drought) crises, and the crucial roles of collaboration and learning in watershed-based decision-making. Following this, Simon Courtenay (Scientific Director, Canadian Water Network) discussed the work of the Canadian Watershed Research Consortium (CWRC) and its focus on supporting regional cumulative effects monitoring and decision-making regarding land-use management, natural resource management, and impact mitigation.

 

Theory of Change: The Anatomy of Strategy, CFGS Global Talk

Where: University of Victoria, Sedgewick Building, Room C168

Cost: Free

Theory of change is fast becoming the phrase du jour of organizations seeking social change, such as foundations, chairities, and social entrepreneurs. But what is theory of change? Is it just another fancy term for strategic planning or is it something different?

Tim Morris (Principal, Morris Consulting) provided an overview of a theory of change process that has been developed for the needs of organizations working on the front lines of water protection, environmental sustainability, and indigenous rights. Through examples and dialogue it revealed how this process is grounded in a very practical approach that seeks to support organizations in uncovering their hidden theories of change. Far from offering a linear path to impact, a good theory of change instils the importance of articulating and challenging assumptions, adapting to changing circumstances, being attentive to indicators of progress, and the necessity of learning from failure.

This event was hosted by the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance and the University of Victoria’s Centre for Global Studies(CFGS) as part of CFGS' Global Talk series.